Friday, May 22, 2009

Did You Plant Marigolds in Your Garden this Year?





They are exceptionally easy to grow, and they keep away aphids, thripes, Mexican Bean beetles, squash bugs, tomato hornworms and whiteflies.

Marigolds also repel harmful root node nematodes (soil-dwelling microscopic white worms) that attack tomatoes, potatoes, roses and strawberries. The root of the Marigold excretes a chemical that is toxic to nematodes, and kills them as they enter the soil.

Marigolds will bloom well into November. These flowers make charming and beneficial garden companion plants for many different types of herbs and vegetables: including beans, basil, cabbage, cucumber and tomatoes.






13 comments:

Kim said...

Yes! I planted Marigolds. My favorites are the Lemon Gem and Tangerine Gem minis. They bloom all summer without much deadheading, and they are so cute.

Alexandria Sewell said...

Alright, Kim! You know the score. I agree, Marigolds are very charming. My favorites are the Little Hero dwarfs.

Smoodles said...

My garden is loosely based on the square foot gardening system. I gave Marigolds their own section. Should I have just put them in the sections with other plants?

Alexandria Sewell said...

I think you probably should have put them with other plants, as they are remarkable companions, and repel certain types of pests.

Smoodles said...

I guess I'll know for next year. Hopefully, they'll still do some good. When should I plan on planting the seeds for them each year in zone 6?

Bangchik and Kakdah said...

Whats left from the battle with snails/slugs seem to grow well in my garden... with the help of poison baits. Good Luck to your marigolds.... ~ bangchik

Jan (Thanks For 2 Day) said...

I have to be honest, and tell you that I haven't been a huge marigold fan...but DID purchase seed packets this spring and intend on planting them any day now...I guess I better hurry up! I saw varieties that I'd never seen before and suddenly they actually appealed to me. I don't know their names off-hand, but I have at least 3 types...and I'm glad to know all of the interesting info. about them!

Alexandria Sewell said...

Jan,

I hadn't been a huge marigold fan either, until I found out what a wonderful and useful companion plant they are. They just seemed so "common" to me. Now I'm a big fan. Good luck with your seeds!

Jan (Thanks For 2 Day) said...

FINALLY, I 're-located' your blog address! Suddenly it didn't appear on Blotanical and I'd not remembered the name. The way I got here this time was to go to someone's blog you had faved, and then look for a message on it from you!! Geez, the trouble I go through for some people...:-) kidding, of course!

I left you a message on Blot. that I couldn't find it:-)

Yes, I'm going to plant marigolds very soon...after I get off these crutches!!! I sprained my ankle 2 days ago and it's all swollen and bruised;-(

Alexandria Sewell said...

That's ironic, Jan. I sprained my ankle just last weekend! Get someone to help you out with your gardening until your ankle mends. Sometimes those types of injuries can take a while to heal.

I'm going to be posting photos of my tomato/marigold combos soon. The tomatoes have been growing like crazy! The mariogolds are "happy" and perky right by their sides.

Michelle Schaefer said...

We planted marigolds in our garden this year. Not sure what variety though because they are the tallest marigolds I've ever seen. They are nearly as tall as our tomatoes.

I knew you should always have them with your tomatoes but I never knew why. Just something my grandmother taught me as a little girl. She told me to keep certain icky bugs away but I never knew quite which ones. Thanks for sharing.

Anonymous said...

Hi Kim I am an old timer at gardening having done it on a farm now for about 30 years. I grow veggies, fruit trees, berries and herbs. I also freeze and can. I pressure cook meats. I am a diehard at this. Although for many years gardening was looked down upon as something we no longer need. Now I am seeing a resurgence due to the high costs in stores of basics. I would like to stay updated on your site. Robin

Anonymous said...

To get taller growing tomato plants use concrete wire or something similar and use wire to twist it in the size circle you want, make them about 6 feet tall and train your plant to go up. It is alot hardier than the store ones. And you get large plants that do well. You can reach your arm in through the squares of the wire. Amazing results!!

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