Tuesday, June 9, 2009

The Deadly N. Deroose Alata - Bug-Eating Houseplant







This plant is a hybrid developed by a Nepenthes grower, DeRoose in Beligium.


Most pitcher plants aren't easy to grow in the typical home environment. However, this one makes an excellent houseplant. It tolerates a reasonable amount of growing conditions, and is very forgiving of mistakes. In really bright conditions the pitchers turn completely red!


The adult pitchers can reach up to 6 inches in length. This tropical perennial is a true tropical, and in colder climates must be grown as a houseplant. Now to the "deadlier" aspects of this plants personality...


It attracts prey with its brightly colored pitchers of red, gold and green. The pitchers also bear scattered nectar glands on the lid, peristome or "lip" surrounding the lid. According to Barry A. Rice in Growing Carnivorous Plants, "large glands on the inner edge of the peristome entice insects to the very edge of slippery danger."

5 comments:

Janet said...

I have never had a carnivorous plant (inside) does it have to eat bugs? Do you have to feed it? I guess I have moths that fly in, but on the whole I don't get too many bugs in the house. (one of the dogs eats the flies that come in) It is a beautiful plant. Very interesting.

Alexandria Sewell said...

Janet, nope the plant does not need bugs to survive at all. It just needs light and water. This particular type of plant can benefit from a light fertlilizer from time to time. I keep my N. Deroose in a small greenhouse in my living room. It happens to be host to fungus gnats, which all of the carnivorous plants seem to enjoy feasting on. Thank you for the compliment on the plant's appearance. I try my best to take good care of it.

Smoodles said...

"The adult pitchers can reach up to 6 inches in length."

Does size matter?

Alexandria Sewell said...

LOL - Yes Smoodles, they can and it looks like this time they will. What a comparison to some things in the human world, eh?

Aaron said...

were did you get this plant from?

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